Beer IndustryA set of new guidelines within the U.S. beer industry will allow consumers to count the calories that they consume with each bottle, Bloomberg News reported.

The Beer Institute said several companies that include Anheuser-Busch and MillerCoors will start listing down information on calories, carbohydrates and other product ingredients on beer labels by the end of 2020. Information on alcohol by volume will also be visible.

Beer Institute CEO Jim McGreevy said the new guidelines will help beer drinkers make more informed decisions when purchasing products within the most popular alcoholic beverage in the U.S.

Beer Rules

The new guidelines are not entirely unprecedented, but rather more expanded in terms of listed information. For instance, MillerCoors has already included calorie numbers in early 2014 on each Miller64 product. Since then, the company has put such details on more than 12 of its beer brands.

The Beer Institute’s new industry guidelines follow an Alcohol and Tobacco Tax Trade Bureau ruling in 2013, which permitted brewing companies to list more information on beer labels.

Something’s Brewing

As beer guidelines become more updated, established craft breweries and those looking to set up one face a bright future due to the continuously growing craft beer industry.

Between January and July 2016, production volume for craft beer products rose 8%, according to data from the Brewer’s Association. During this period, the industry launched 917 new craft breweries, while 2,200 facilities are in the planning stages. The industry also employs more than 121,000 people on a full- or part-time basis.

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Brewer’s Association Chief Economist Bart Wilson said the statistics represented positive signs for the sector. They also indicated that most of the markets have not reached a saturation point.

Even if most markets are not yet saturated, though, the popularity of brewing in some areas makes it hard for new breweries to set a stable position in the market, according to The Huffington Post.